Summer Boxing Camp Teaches Kids a Different Form of Art

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VINELAND, N.J. -

Vineland resident David Anthony is looking forward to opening the hearts and minds of citizens in Cumberland County and letting them know that there’s another type of artform they may have overlooked, which can be equally as beneficial to people’s lives, especially to those of children: He calls it the art of boxing.

When people think of artists, they usually think of world-renowned painters like Michelangelo or Salvador Dali; others may even think of mesmerizing musical performers, such as Frank Sinatra, Lady Gaga, or the Wu-Tang Clan.

Vineland resident David Anthony is looking forward to opening the hearts and minds of citizens in Cumberland County and letting them know that there’s another type of artform they may have overlooked, which can be equally as beneficial to people’s lives, especially to those of children: He calls it the art of boxing.

Anthony, a 15-year union construction worker (General Laborer’s Local 172) and owner of Vila Boxing L.L.C., is passionate about helping children become positive and useful members of our society, and believes that boxing may be a key to opening the doors of future success for the young ones.

To that end, from July 10th to August 25th, for children ages 8 to 16 years old, he will be holding his first annual Vila Boxing Summer Camp at Vila Boxing, located at 106 W. Landis Ave., Vineland.

The fee is $75 per week for the seven-week course, and July 7th is the last day of registration. However, Anthony is flexible and will extend the date, if necessary, for latecomers.

“I want to provide more than headgear and boxing gloves,” said Anthony when expressing what he hopes to accomplish by starting this unique summer camp. “I want to provide knowledge, self-confidence, and to build the self-esteem [of the children].”

Anthony, a native New Yorker born in the Bronx, is a USA Certified Boxing Coach and former boxer, who went to numerous Boys and Girls Clubs as a young boy, and wants to share his experiences with those who have registered for his camp. He is committed to bolstering the lives of children in this area and is keenly aware that the lessons he plans on teaching his campers could have a positive long-lasting effect on them.

“I’m looking to show [them the benefits] of discipline, hard work and dedication,” said Anthony, which he believes he can instill into the children who participate in his camp. He also knows that those who grasp on to his teachings will be able to transfer those skills to the outside world, and become better students, better sons and daughters, and better people as a whole.

You may wonder what a day at his summer boxing might look like.

Well, it starts at 8 a.m. and ends at 4 p.m., Monday through Friday. At 8:30 a.m., the children will eat breakfast. Around 9:30 a.m., they will begin the boxing curriculum, which will vary from day-to-day. One day they could be working on offensive moves, the next day, they may be coached on how to counter-punch their opponents. There will always be cardio workout sessions, which include running and jumping rope. At 12 noon, lunch will be served, then around 12:45 p.m., they will get back to training.

It’s a summer boxing camp, not a boot camp, so the kids will get some downtime, and there will be periods throughout each day when they will be able to change gears and relax while playing video games, board games and watching movies. Anthony also plans on having outdoor recreation days that will include a “Wednesday Swim Day” and has a couple of field trips planned for the children.

The campers will have a major say in where they will go to on certain field trips, but there’s one place Anthony is scheduling to take them, which might even make the coach feel like a kid again.

“I’m working on taking them to my old gym that I went to when I grew up,” said Anthony. The place is called Gleason’s Gym in Brooklyn. He thinks his former boxing coach will be pleasantly surprised if he shows up there with his campers. “If my coach sees me with 15 kids he’s going to be like ‘Whoa, I did my job.’”

Running a summer camp is an immensely arduous task, but thankfully Anthony will not have to tackle this honorable endeavor on his own.

He reached out to the Community FoodBank of New Jersey - Southern Branch (CFBNJ), located in Egg Harbor Township for assistance, and they are contributing to his positive cause by supplying food throughout the seven-week camp.

“He has a great camp plan to keep kids fit,” explained Briana Lyons, child feedings program manager at CFBNJ. “He has a unique program, and we’re excited to work with him.”

CFBNJ is “providing my breakfast and lunch for the kids,” said Anthony. “I am so thankful to them.”

By revealing the science behind the art of boxing to his campers, Anthony believes the children will grow up to be well-rounded, up-standing, and positive citizens in the community and feels grateful he has the opportunity to impart this wisdom to the next generation.

“The goal is to teach boxing, but not just to teach boxing,” said Anthony. If he achieves his objective the children will leave his Vila Boxing Summer Camp with the supreme knowledge that “they can do” whatever they set their minds to. 

For more information call David Anthony at 609-470-3043, or email him at chino2270@gmail.com.


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